Amarella Booklet

The new Amarella Booklet is online. Find out more about direct trade, the different farms and coffee.


Espresso Cuptasting // 20.03.2019

On 20th of March 2019, we would like to invite you to our Espresso Cupasting at Hans-Thoma-Straße 20 in Mannheim.

From 11.00 am to 3.00 pm, you can enjoy Espressi from various farms and in different roast depths.

Date: 20.03.2019

Time: 11:00 am – 3:00 pm

Location: Amarella | Hans-Thoma-Straße 20 | 68163 Mannheim

We are looking forward to cuptaste these coffees with you and would like to ask you for a notice about your participation: info@amarella.com. Seats are limited. At present we are offering over 200 single estate terrace coffees from Mexico, India, El Salvador and Brazil, which are all packed in 30kg bags. We are glad to offer mixed pallets (up to 20 bags at 30kg). Please indicate your interest, if you wish to receive our green coffee list of the available coffees.


Hibrido-de-Timor Cuptasting // 23.01.2019

In the beginning of the year, on Wednesday, 23rd January 2019, we would like to invite you to our first cupasting – focussing on Hibrido-de-Timor lines – at Hans-Thoma-Straße 20 in Mannheim. Continue reading…


India ”MEET THE FARMER” Cuptasting 07.11.2018 11:00am

Together with the owner of Badra Estates, Jacob Mammen we would like to taste some selected coffees. Continue reading…


El Salvador-CUPTASTING // CROP 2017/18 // 07.09.2018

The new crop (2017/18) is being presented at the El Salvador-Cuptasting. Experience the sensorial differences of 41 terrace coffees from one farm. It is possible to buy lots exclusively and have your own logo printed on the coffee bags, as usual.

Continue reading…


India // Badra-Cuptasting // 17.08.2018 // 11:00 Uhr //

The samples of the latest crop from Badra Estates just arrived. The new crop (2017/18) is being presented at the Badra-Cuptasting. Experience the sensorial differences of 37 terrace coffees from one farm. It is possible to buy lots exclusively and have your own logo printed on the coffee bags, as usual.

For this we have selected the following coffees: Continue reading…


The Main Defects Of Raw Coffee

 Raw coffee is classified according to the guidelines of the New York Board of Trading based on the number of defects identified as follows.

 

 Development and growth deficiencies

 

1 Black Bean = 1 defect

 Beans with fully or at least = . black discolored surface which is often puckered and wrinkled. Some beans are black through and through, others are brownish-grey inside.

Reason: prolonged contact of the coffee bean with the soil, causing an uncontrolled fermentation process in the bean, late harvesting, frequently caused also by mildew forming on the plant

Roasting: small increase in volume, the roasted bean has a grayish color

Taste: acridly bitter, sometimes sour, fermented taste

 

3 Dark Green Beans = 1 defect

Beans discolored a dark green but of normal weight

Reason: contact with water after hulling

Roasting: inhomogeneous behavior, tendency to create bittering agents, reduced volume increase

Taste: musty, slightly sour, slightly astringent

 

2 Sour Beans = 1 defect

 Low weight beans with a reddish-brown surface, can be wrinkled and unevenly colored, have a dried out appearance

Reason: fermentation of ripe beans in the cherry through late harvesting or prolonged contact with the soil

Roasting: beans have a lighter and more irregular color

Taste: sour, acridly bitter, also have an astringent effect in the mouth

 

5 Unripe Beans = 1 defect

 These light, grayish-greenish beans have considerably less density than fully ripe beans

Reason: harvesting of unripe beans

Roasting: the beans stay a light brown/beige color when roasted. They develop less depth of color.

Taste: smells slightly of peanuts and has an astringent effect in the mouth

 

5 Quakers = 1 defect

 Quakers are unripe beans, light green in color with light grey hues. They have a crinkled surface which can be discolored brown-black in parts.

Reason: blemished, underdeveloped beans

Roasting: the beans char

Taste: bitter, sour, metallic

 

 Damage by pests


5 Eaten Beans = 1 defect

 Beans damaged and more or less eaten through by insects. The holes have diameters between 0.5 up to 1.5 mm.

Reason: beans are attacked by insects with the scientific name Hypothenemus Hampey; they are also known as broca or caruncho

Roasting: beans can be over-roasted due to their lower mass and when they become porous, they break. Small fragments may become charred.

Taste: bitter

 

 Deterioration

3 shells = 1 defect

 Shells are deformed beans with thin walls which look like an ear or shell.

Cause: strong wind or rain during an thesis, causing “madres” to form which then separate into a concha and an inner section

Roasting: beans char either wholly or partially, become brittle

Taste: bitter, charred


5 broken beans = 1 defect

 Shells are deformed beans with thin walls which look like an ear or shell.

Cause: strong wind or rain during an thesis, causing “madres” to form which then separate into a concha and an inner section

Roasting: beans char either wholly or partially, become brittle

Taste: bitter, charred

 

 Processing errors

 

1 Large Husk = 1 defect (fragment of dried husk)
2 Medium Husks = 1 defect
2 Small Husks = 1 defect                                                                                                                                                               

Fragments of the dried pulp

 Cause: incorrect dehulling (of naturals) and inadequate sorting/cleaning

 Roasting: char depending on size, may also burn completely

 Taste: bitter and mildewed

 

2 Parchments = 1 defect

 Beans which are still fully or partly covered by the hull

Cause: parchment does not separate properly from the bean

Roasting: the parchment can burn up or char in the roaster which may cause delayed roasting of the bean, resulting in an end product which is not fully roasted

Taste: bitter taste from the charred parchment, lack of aroma due to insufficient roasting of the bean

 

1 Pod = 1 defect

 Whole dried coffee cherries which still contain beans

Cause: incorrect adjustment of the pulper/dehuller

Roasting: the cherries char, the beans are not fully roasted charred, impure

 

 Foreign bodies

Small Stone = 1 defect
Medium Stone = 2 defects
Large Stone = 5 defects

 Stones of various shapes and sizes, also volcanic stone (including soft pumice) such as tuff (agglomerations of volcanic ash, fragments of rock and/or glass) and pumice (very light lava frothed up by carbon dioxide to form a fine-pored foam and hardened)

Reason: inadequate destoning or sorting

Roasting: stones do not affect the roasting process

Taste: stones do not affect the taste

Other: stones can cause serious damage to the mill

 

Small Twig = 1 defect
Medium Twig = 2 defects
Large Twig = 5 defects

 Woody parts of trees of all shapes and sizes

Reason: method of harvesting when twigs can be caught up in the crop (stripping, mechanized), inadequate sorting process

Roasting: twigs can catch fire in the drum or simply char

Taste: bitter, mildewed

 

Small Lump of Earth = 1 defect
Medium Lump of Earth = 2 defects
Large Lump of Earth = 5 defects

Lumps of earth of any size or composition (parts of sand, loam, clay, etc)

 Reason: inadequate sorting, frequently found when coffee beans are dried directly on the ground

 Roasting: lumps of soil can break down and become charred

 Taste: charred earth adds a bitter, earthy taste to the cup


El Salvador ”MEET THE FARMER” Cuptasting 07.06.2018 11:00am

Together with the owner of Finca La Qintanilla, Anrés Quintanilla  we would like to taste some selected coffees of  his Finca La Quintanilla and Mexican Finca .

For this we have selected the following coffees: Continue reading…


The Coffee Cherry

There are not always exactly two beans in a coffee cherry. The following photo shows that in addition to coffee cherries with two beans, there also cherries with one or three beans. There are also coffee cherries with more than three beans. However, this is rare. In botanical terms, up to 17 bean variants have been described.

Characteristics of Coffea arabica (Arabica)

The Arabica species has developed around 600 different varieties through geographical dispersal, natural development and constantly rising production volumes. One of the best known is the “Coffea Arabica Mocha“. Arabica is considered to be the higher grade of the two most important species in the global market. It contains around only half as much caffeine as C. Canephora, but develops an aroma which makes it the most important species of the genus. The taste is characterized by a fine, fruity acidic note and is only mildly bitter. Arabica beans tend to be long (around 2:1 ratio) and have a curved, S-shaped profile. Central and South America are the main areas of cultivation. Around 90 % of the producing areas in Colombia are in the mountains and Arabica is cultivated there almost exclusively. It flourishes best at annual temperatures between 15° C and 24° C. The highest altitude for cultivation is determined by the possible freezing point in the mountains, since only a mild frost will kill off the Arabica plants. The reason for the generally higher quality of mountain-grown coffee lies in the lower average temperatures at higher altitudes. After anthesis, when the first coffee cherries develop, they grow more slowly at lower temperatures. The same effect is achieved by shade cultivation; this gives the cherries more time to develop taste, aroma and fine fruit acids. The Arabica cherries ripen over nine to eleven months on average.

Characteristics of Coffea canephora (Robusta)

These plants are popular with coffee farmers due to their high resistance to coffee rust; they are also more
resistant to parasites, disease and heat. The name is derived from these characteristics. Due to the higher
average temperatures, they ripen over six to nine months, a comparatively short period. The beans of
C. Canephora are smaller than those of Arabica, rounder and with a straight cut. The taste is markedly bitterer
and more spicy than that of Arabica, with almost no acid. The most important producing areas are West and
Central Africa, followed by South-East Asia; C. Canephora (including the variety Conillon) is grown in Brazil in
isolated cases. Since the C. Canephora plant tolerates higher temperatures up to 30° C, this Coffea species is
well suited for cultivation at lower altitudes.


Processing Methods

Wet Milling

These are divided into dry processing and various washed (wet) processes. Normally it is the climatic conditions in the producer country which determines the type of processing and not the taste aimed for.

Dry processing

This is also called “natural“, “GB“ (Gewone Berijding) and “cherries“ (India).

The whole cherry is dried with the pulp. Osmosis
which occurs during the drying process produces
greater sweetness in the coffee. The dried cherries
are subsequently hulled at the dry milling stage and
the hard pulp is removed. Normally the cherries are
dried in situ. Dry processing does not preclude the
use of water (e.g. for separating floaters and sinkers
during the wet milling stage before processing).      
(Natural)

 

 

Washed (wet) processing

Also called “W. I. B.“ (West Indian Berijding), “W. I. P.“ (West Indian Preparation), “Parchment“ for C.
canephora (India) and “Plantation“ for Arabica (India).

During washed processing only the parchment coffee is dried in contrast to dry processing; the cherry
is removed previously. This requires the use of a pulper. The pulper (large roller or disk covered in nubs)
squeezesthe pulp from the cherries. The next processing stage determines how the overall process is called.

1. Pulped Natural
The coffee beans are dried directly after pulping.
The remaining pulp still sticking to the beans dries
on the hull, creating an even higher basic sweetness
in the coffee compared with “natural” processing.
This gives coffee processed with the pulped natural
method the highest sweetness of all types of
processing.

         (Pulped Natural)

 2. Semi-Washed                                                                                                                                                                                            After processing in the pulper the beans are cleaned mechanically by brushing and friction to remove the
remains of the pulp still sticking to the beans.

 

 

 

 

                                                                                        (Mechanical cleaning)                                               (Semi-Washed)

3. Washed (auch fully Washed)
The beans are cleaned chemically, not mechanically, using lactobacillus acidophilus bacteria. On exiting
the pulper the beans are floated in large fermentation tanks and ferment for up to 72 hours in an acid
environment caused by the formation of lactic acid. This gives the coffee strong fruity tones and more acid.
The remaining pulp separates very easily and remains in the fermentation water.                                                                                                                                                                                 

                 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Fermentation tank)    

 

 

(Fully Washed)

 

 


Allelopathy

Shade coffee cultivation

In some countries, coffee plants grow between other plants and trees which provide a protective canopy.
This method of cultivation results in lower yields than full sun cultivation; this is due to the coffee cherries
ripening more slowly in the shade.

Coffee-shaded by bananas

The shade trees equalize the variations in temperature between day and night, protect against frost and
wind, restrict weeds and prevent soil erosion. They extract minerals from the soil but return them to it
through their leaves. Shade trees with very deep roots do not compete with coffee plants for nutrients. Shade
trees can reduce the intensity of insolation considerably (depending on altitude).

Coffee plant with pine tree

Shade plantations have a higher biodiversity, less weeds, more insects, better, more constant humidity and
better supply of nutrients for the coffee plants since the trees extract minerals from lower depths in the soil
and return them to the soil and hence to the coffee plants via their leaves. The origin of Coffea arabica shows
that shade cultivation of coffee is the original way of cultivating the plant. In Ethiopia, coffee plants were
initially limited to two montane forest areas – in an environment which offered considerable shade.


5th of April 18 Cupping – PreShipment Fazendas Dutra 2017

The samples of the latest crop from Fazendas Dutra just arrived. The new crop is being presented at the preshipment-cuptasting. Expirence the sensorial differences of 65 terrace coffees from one farm. It is possible to buy lots exclusively and have your own logo printed on the coffee bags, as usual.

We received following varieties from the Dutras:

Coffea Canephora:

-Conillon Vermelho (natural/fully washed)

Coffea Arabica:

-Aramosa (pulped natural)
-Catuaí Vermelho (natural/pulped natural/fully washed)
-Catuaí Amarelo (natural/pulped natural)
-Catucai Vermelho (pulped natural)
-Catucai 785 (pulped natural)
-Mundo Novo Vermelho (pulped natural)
-Mundo Novo Amarelo (natural)
-Bourbon Amarelo (natural/pulped natural)
-Oeiras (natural)
-Naomi (pulped natural)
-Pacamara Amarelo (natural)
-Icatu Amarelo (pulped natural)
-S795 (fully washed)

The preshipment cuptasting takes place on 5th of April and will start at 11.00 a.m. and will take until 04.00 p.m.

We are looking forward to cuptaste these coffees with you and would like to ask you for a notice about your participation @info@amarella.com. Seats are limited.

At present we are offering over 150 single estate terrace coffees from Mexico, El Salvador, India and Brazil, which are packed as usually in our 30kg bags. We are glad to offer and mixed pallet (up to 20bag at 30kg). Please indicate your interest, if you wish to receive our green coffee list of the available coffees.

Please find more information at: https://www.amarella.com/ or at the social media platforms Facebook https://www.facebook.com/AmarellaTrading or linkedIn (amarella trading).

We are looking forward hearing from you.


Hibrido-de-Timor Cuptasting // 23.01.2018

In the beginning of the year, on Tuesday, 23rd January 2018, we would like to invite you to our first cupasting – focussing on Hibrido-de-Timor lines – at Hans-Thoma-Straße 20 in Mannheim. Continue reading…